693 Gender and the Constitution (3)

A course in which the notion of gender is applied to constitutions as formative documents for open societies.  The course takes seriously the critique that older constitutions are in fact filled with masculine gendered language that has implications for contemporary civil rights struggles and for causes in which historic limitations or forms of discrimination have been explicitly gendered (e.g., marriage, reproductive rights). Students will read scholarly materials and cases that mine this nation’s constitutions and that of other countries for examples of the feminist critique of constitutional language and frameworks embedded in a history of male supremacy. Themes included in the study include the drafting of constitutional language, representation, citizenship, and even the impact of gendered identities on the highest courts. The aim is to produce a discourse on how one can use gender as a category of analysis in the theory and practice of constitutionalism.

This course is normally offered every third year.